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A New Home for Carly

Background

I first met Carly back in 2008 when, together with my colleague Maureen Norton-Hawk, I launched a long-term project following the life experiences of criminalized women. Younger than most of the women we were meeting at homeless shelters and women’s centers around Boston, Carly recently had been released from prison on a drug dealing charge. This was her first and only arrest and she herself had never used hard drugs. “I just smoke weed,” she told me, “because it helps me deal with my emotions from abuse.”

In the wake of childhood sexual abuse Carly had been removed from her family, spent a few good years in foster care and then three not-so-good years in a juvenile residential treatment center which she left the day she turned eighteen. “I regret it now,” Carly murmured, “but at the time I didn’t know what it is to be homeless.”

Two years at homeless shelters and on the streets, then a year in state prison followed by a return to the shelters left Carly with single-minded determination to get an apartment of her own. Life at Long Island Shelter (which has since been closed; see Outcast Island) helped her keep her eye on the prize and her name on every housing waiting list in the Boston area.

Carly’s First Apartment

http://www.mold-help.org/content/view/420/
Source.

In 2014 Carly finally got an apartment subsidized through a Section VIII government voucher provided by the non-profit agency Home Start. From the outside the building looked nice enough, but inside the stairwell was disintegrating. For $1150 / month, Carly moved into an apartment in which daily sweeping was insufficient to keep up with the mice droppings on the floors or the piles of sawdust created by some sort of wood-chomping insect. Each time I visited her, I could see the mold growing on more places in the walls. In some places, the mold actually seemed to be holding the wall up.

Complicating matters, the apartment was officially a one-bedroom but actually had another half bedroom. While for some people this would be a bonus, that was not the case for Carly. She explained, “I am too generous and can’t say no to people. I’ve been there and know what it’s like not to have a home. So I let people stay with me and then I get hurt.” For a while she let a man she knew stay in the half room. He “made trouble – brought drugs into the apartment,” and when she told him to leave, finally locking him out, he kicked the door down. “I’m lucky I wasn’t evicted.” Then she let a young woman she met at her church stay with her. “But she wasn’t a true Christian. She kept saying she’d help pay the bills but never did. Then she stole from me.” It took Carly almost six months to persuade the young woman to move out.

Yet with all of this going on, Carly found that having a home allowed her the stability to finish her GED, complete a training program to be a nurse’s aid, and look into possibilities for further education in nursing.

A Turn for the Worse

Source.

In December of 2015, I visited Carly at the maternity triage department of one of the local hospitals. Embarrassed, she told me that she had the misfortune to become pregnant the one time she “slipped” from her Christian vow of pre-marital chastity. When she first learned she was pregnant, Carly recalled, she did not want to go ahead with the pregnancy. Single, unemployed and living in a horrid apartment, she did not feel that she was in a position to raise a child. And, she explained, she was afraid that she would be shunned by her church for the unmarried pregnancy. But after a visit to the Boston Center for Pregnancy Choices where “a woman prayed and talked with me,” she decided to keep the baby.

A quick look at the organization’s website confirmed my suspicion that “Choices” may be a bit misleading. This organization does not perform or give referrals for abortions and strongly encourages women considering abortion to have an ultrasound “to determine viability” before going ahead with the abortion. Co-opting the rhetoric of choice, this organization – like many others of its kind – have been described as “the darlings of the pro-life movement,” dedicated to helping women “choose” to go on with pregnancies.

That day in December, like many other days throughout the late fall and early winter months, Carly was in the hospital while the doctors and nurses tried to get her asthma under control. The problem she explained, is that the asthma is triggered by the living conditions in her apartment. “The landlord is a slumlord,” Carly told me. “He will not fix anything.”

https://dundeemedstudentnotes.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/pre-eclampsia/
Source.

Complicating matters further, Carly’s blood pressure was high and the doctors were concerned that she may have pre-eclampsia, a potentially fatal condition for pregnant women. Carly had struggled with obesity for much of her life. In the year before becoming pregnant, she succeeded at losing a great deal of weight, but pregnant, she had become bigger than ever before.

Now eligible for a $1500 Section VIII voucher for a two bedroom apartment for the baby and herself, she could not find a place for the price allowed by Section VIII. And when she occasionally did spot a listing that fell within the allowed rent, she found that landlords often do not want Section VIII tenants. (SeePoor and Homeless Face Discrimination Under America’s Flawed Housing Voucher System“.)

Carly had made about a hundred calls both in Boston and in the furthest suburbs and hadn’t even made it to the stage of actually looking at an apartment. But she had not lost hope: “God doesn’t turn his back on me.” In the meantime, she continued commuting between the roach-haven and the hospital.

A New Home (For Now)

As it turned out, Carly was right to remain hopeful. In mid February she landed a lovely two bedroom apartment (albeit in the one neighborhood she wished to avoid – Dorchester, where she’d spent her drug dealing younger days).

This is how the apartment came about: Among the dozens of people with whom Carly networked in her apartment search she met a real estate agent who knew another agent, and the two of them made it their mission to find her a place. Since real estate agents often present barriers to apartment-seekers with Section VIII vouchers, this was quite exceptional.

https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/environmental_justice/resources/guidebook/guidebook01.cfm
Source.

“They really helped. They even are splitting the agent’s fee [one month’s rent].” For many Section VIII apartment-seekers the agent’s fee presents an insurmountable barrier to rental. This time, for reasons that we could not ascertain, Home Start was able to pay the fee for Carly. There was, however, one hitch. The monthly rent for the new apartment is $34 / month above the amount permitted by the voucher. Carly told Home Start that she’d pay the difference, but they told her that is not allowed. (For more on bureaucratic hurdles see  Failure by Design: Isabella’s Experiences with Social “Services”.)

The way it finally worked out is that the Boston Center for Pregnancy Choices offered to pay the difference for the first year (Carly does not know what will happen after that one year). She does not know why, but this plan was acceptable to all parties and she should be moving into her apartment next week.

For Carly, the lesson learned is that everything worked out “because I chose life. God is good.”

For me, the lesson isn’t so straightforward. Carly remains precariously housed in an apartment she may be able to keep for only one year. She still lives in one of the most violent neighborhoods in Boston, a neighborhood with particularly high rates of elevated lead levels and of asthma hospitalization rates for children under five. She will be raising a child by herself with no financial support other than welfare and food stamps. Her career momentum is on permanent hold. And, if past track records with similar “pregnancy choice” organizations hold true, Carly is not going to be able to count on her pregnancy-support network for substantial help with the daily grind of single-parenting.

For more on Carly click here and here

For more on housing see Health is Where the Home Is

Health is Where the Home Is

Christmas House Decorations wallpapers

Maybe it’s because of the bitterly cold temperatures at night this week, or maybe it’s my own visceral response to overdosing on television shows with happy family Christmas scenes and neighborhood holiday lighting competitions, but I’ve been giving a lot of thought recently to how housing and homes impact health.

About a decade ago I traveled to the Mississippi Delta, Texas’s Rio Grande Valley, south-central Illinois, the mountains of northern Idaho and the cities of eastern Massachusetts to speak with individuals and families scraping by without health insurance. Most of these people worked in construction, retail, agricultural or service jobs. The details varied, but across the country I heard about spiraling poor health, declining employability and growing poverty. In 2015 I made return trips to check in with the people I’d met ten years earlier.[i] While I was able to locate nearly all of the original interviewees who owned their homes (including very modest homes of immigrants in colonias in the Rio Grande Valley), I only located a minority of the renters. Typically, their original phone numbers were disconnected and original addresses belonged to subsequent tenants. When I knocked on neighbors’ doors the most common response was, “I don’t know [so-and-so]. I’ve only lived here for a few months myself.”

In previous posts I’ve written about marginalized Boston-area women who cycle through shelters, jails and the streets. In those contexts the “problem of homelessness” is relatively easy to see and define – all I had to do was visit shelters or walk through the public parks in which people without homes congregate during the day. But for me, it took weeks of trudging through muddy housing developments on the outskirts of Mississippi towns and knocking on doors in public housing complexes in a central Illinois cities to get a glimpse of the lives of those less visible Americans who generally manage to rent housing of some sort for periods of time but teeter on a financial edge that keeps them moving from place to place.

Unfinished housing project at 47-04 198th St. in Auburndale stands abandoned for several years.

On my 2015 reprise tour I looked for a total of 145 people in five states and was able to locate 98 of them. The missing people were not evenly distributed either geographically or by race. In Mississippi, the state that consistently has the poorest health profile in the country, I managed to locate only 11 of the 28 people whom I sought. The utter disappearance of 17 of 28 people did not surprise one local healthcare advocate (he asked to remain anonymous): “People move away to Birmingham or Tupelo to look for work. There is very little home ownership in Mississippi. The common thing is ‘lease to own’ in which a developer arranges for people to ‘lease’ (pay rent) and after 20 years they have an option to buy – to switch the rent to a mortgage. But people almost never make it to the 20 years so the developers keep leasing the same houses over.” Many of these houses would not pass even the most cursory safety inspection in other states.

I was able to locate 70 out of 88 white people I’d originally interviewed and 21 of 28 Latinos / Latinas (mostly in the Rio Grande Valley), but I only found 10 of 29 African Americans. This is consistent with national patterns. According to the US Census, the homeownership rate for the fourth quarter 2014 for non-Hispanic White householders was highest at 72 percent. The rate for All Other Races householders was 55 percent. And for Black householders it was only 42 percent. According to researchers Gregory Sharp and Matthew Hall, “The 1968 passage of the Fair Housing Act outlawed housing market discrimination based on race. …  However, emerging racial disparities over the next three decades resulted in black owners who bought their homes in the 2000s being 50 percent more likely to lose their homeowner status than similar white owners.” Even after adjusting for socio-economic characteristics, debt loads, education, and life-cycle traits like divorce or job loss, blacks were more likely to lose their homes than whites.”

Shanice’s Story

I first met Shanice in 2003 at one of the larger Black churches in Decatur, IL – a church known for its strong fellowship and advocacy on behalf of the community. She was happy to share her story with me:

“When I was 18 I worked a job, it was right after coming out of high school. No insurance and they said I wasn’t eligible for Medicaid. My doctor said that I needed to get my tonsils taken out cause they were so swollen it was almost causing me not to be able to breathe. … And so I had to go on like a payment plan with the doctor. … The whole surgery, the surgeon, the day at the hospital and then I had a setback and had to go back into the hospital cost $15,000. During the following year collection agencies called day and night, often making threats. They’d [especially] call on Sunday nights. Said that I would be going to jail if I didn’t pay them.” At age 20, Shanice filed for bankruptcy.

A few years later Shanice gave birth to her daughter. By this time Shanice was working for a storefront loan company that provided health insurance for her, but not for her daughter (she would have had to pay a premium that she could not afford on her salary.) A few years later their statuses reversed: When Illinois expanded Medicaid for children (Kid Care) her daughter became covered but Shanice, having made the decision to go back to school and learn a skill, became uninsured. Shanice was well aware of the risk she was taking was determined to build a better future for herself and her daughter. “It wasn’t just me living this carefree don’t worry about tomorrow life. Now I have someone that was dependent on me so I had to make decisions for the future. … We moved into a nice apartment, we got power, cable, phone and I got a new car.” During that time Shanice began to eat healthier meals and lost over one hundred pounds. In order to pay tuition, “I got Pell grants and student loans.” I asked Shanice how she was able to get credit to buy a car so soon after declaring bankruptcy. “Oh, they go after bankruptcy people like crazy [to sell them stuff]. I was getting credit cards in the mail every night.”

In 2003, after spending time with Shanice and her daughter at the church where they sang in the choirs, participated in groups and clubs that helped them focus on making good decisions, and volunteered helping out the poor in their community, I described Shanice in my notes as “a young woman on the way up.” She was working part-time at her church with youth and looking for her first professional job. “I just completed 1540 hours of cosmetology school and I just graduated last Friday.”

When Shanice and I walked out of the small room where the church choir stored its robes, I asked her if as a cosmetologist she would get health insurance. She answered, “I can get a job but in this field they don’t give insurance. You have to arrange that yourself.”

….

A year or so later I spoke with Shanice again. With a sense of resignation, she told me that medical and credit card debt had piled up and she was preparing to declare bankruptcy a second time.

….

Fast forward twelve years. I returned to the address at which Shanice was living when I initially met her. She had moved on and none of the current neighbors even knew her name. On USSearch I found six other addresses for her and visited each one of them. Two of the addresses did not exist. One was in a decrepit housing project that had been shut down for several years, though some people continued to squat in the apartments. (I was warned that mostly gang members were there and that it wouldn’t be safe for me to go poking around.) One address was in a middle-class, white neighborhood – none of the neighbors whom I could find knew of anyone named Shanice. Two were inhabited by other Black families who had moved in recently. Stopping by her church, I was told that, “Shanice is no longer a member of this church. She’s moved.” No one at the church knew where.

Health and Housing

It’s not hard to understand the devastating health consequences of homelessness. Living on the streets exposes people to cold, rain and assault. Without a home it’s a challenge to eat proper meals, get enough sleep and keep oneself and one’s clothing clean. The stress of not knowing where one can lay one’s head contributes to misuse of drugs and alcohol. And infections of various sorts tend to spread quickly in crowded homeless shelters. Like the people in the shelters, these health consequences are easily identified and counted.

The health consequences of moving around are less immediately visible to the casual eye. But at a community health center in Decatur Illinois, nurse administrators Karen Schneller and Tanya Andricks elaborated on ways in which churn in housing is related to churn in healthcare. Different states and even different counties and towns have different healthcare resources available to residents. Different providers have different medication preferences and treatment protocols so people stop and start treatments. Even with dedicated staff efforts, it is impossible to provide follow-up care for patients who can’t be reached – whose phones are turned off and whose mail is returned “addressee unknown.”

Jenny Trimmell, public health administrator and Melissa Rome, community liaison at the Vermilion County (Illinois) Health Department explained that children like Shanice’s daughter particularly suffer from frequent moves. “When the Cabrini Green housing project in Chicago was closed to pave the way for gentrification former residents were offered vouchers by the Housing Authority and promised housing and jobs in towns in central Illinois. But there was not enough housing and not enough jobs, so people go back and forth to Chicago. There was a cultural adjustment for many moving from Chicago to more rural downstate.  People were unaware that services outside of the city of Chicago may be limited, such as access to health care providers; bus services that do not run 24/7, etc.  Everyone is frustrated. The kids are in and out of schools and medical records kept by parents are incomplete or non-existent. It is difficult for the Health Department to determine immunization status for these children and frequently immunization series have to be started over due to the unknown immunization status.” Trimmell and Rome went on to explain that without the kinds of community support children develop when they stay put in one school, “there are high drop-out rates, teen pregnancies and drug use.”

Musings

Getting to know and then losing track of Shanice and others in similar situations has made me more attuned to the health privileges of stable and secure housing. My home allows me to accumulate the material objects that anchor and enhance my life, both in immediate ways by giving me space to store medication and in less tangible ways by grounding me in the photos, books and furnishings that tie me to my past and to the people I love. My home provides a hidey-hole for times when the outside world feels overwhelming. It gives me a familiar bed and private bathroom when I am sick, and a kitchen in which I can cook the food that I want to eat when I want to eat it. My home allows me to cultivate neighbors who can lend a hand at times of need and offers me the space to nurture those special bonds with the family that looks out for my well-being. In my own home I have the power to keep out rats, roaches, mold and the dust and down that I am allergic to. I am not dependent on the vagaries of landlords or property management companies. No less important, my home gives me an address at which I receive and retain the paperwork that helps keep my financial, medical and legal life in order as well as reminders of when and where to exercise my right to vote (yes – for candidates who support legislation that makes my community healthier).

I plan to return to Decatur next week and resume my search for Shanice. Maybe she has found another supportive church community somewhere else in the area. Maybe she finally has her healthcare coverage straightened out. Maybe her daughter has escaped being one of the kids who’s been subjected to multiple rounds of vaccinations. Maybe she’s become the star of her high school marching band or debate team. I hope so.

 

 

[i] In each community I began with the contact information people had given me when we first met. Only a minority still lived at the same address or had the same phone number. Then I turned to phone books, social media, Google and other public-access online search engines, including USSearch that listed multiple address histories for many of the people. In each community, if my initial attempts to make contact failed, I then called on common acquaintances, knocked on doors of neighboring houses, and asked at local grocery stores, libraries and churches.

For more on this project:”The State(s) of the Affordable Care Act”

For more on housing struggles, take a look at this article about “Carly”

Social Capital, Cultural Capital and Faith Communities

“What Churches Don’t Get About Ministering to Marginalized Women” – By Jennifer L. Hollis

Originally published in Sojourners 10-12-2015

See the full article here:

“One of the things that most saddens me in conversations with criminalized and marginalized women is the absence of any sort of philosophy or theology — what I call cultural scripts — for making sense out of their suffering,” sociologist Dr. Susan Sered explained to my church earlier this year. …

Faith communities must address unmet needs for meaning and community in the lives of people who suffer. Too focused on the symptoms of structural social inequalities, churches set up soup kitchens or food pantries, whose irregular schedules force poor and homeless Americans to run around among a variety of different organizations in order to be able to eat and feed their families every day. This process covers up the lack of a real safety net in our public policies instead of challenging those policies. And when a church or nonprofit gives, and poor Americans receive, the relationship makes a social — and implicitly moral — distinction between the haves and the have-nots, between the people who serve, and the people who are served. …

 

Many of the classes and programs in which women participate (voluntarily or not) teach them that in order to ‘recover’ they must take responsibility for their own problems, stop blaming others, extricate themselves from ‘co-dependent relationships,’ and learn to ‘do me’ rather than giving themselves to others. “This message undermines traits such as generosity and sympathy which women may most value in themselves,” Sered told me. “It distracts attention from the social violence that sends so many women into the institutional circuit to begin with, and negates the possibility of finding meaning in suffering.”

Sered believes that faith communities, especially churches, have a radical opportunity to do something different: help these women make meaning out of their suffering. “At least as a Jewish outsider looking in, it seems to me that the power of Jesus’ preaching as well as his horrific death is that suffering has cosmic meaning, that it has identifiable causes, and that those who have suffered the most can have the most to offer other people,” said Sered.

Continue reading at: https://sojo.net/articles/what-churches-dont-get-about-ministering-marginalized-women#sthash.KEFWJpow.dpuf

Pinktober: A Consumer Dystopia

(Thank you to Lois Ahrens for bringing the pink handcuffs to my attention.)

Each October, as national breast cancer month rolls around, I find myself fluctuating between pink-nausea and pink-rage. The pink ribbon extravaganza, a month-long consumer fest that turns women’s suffering into cold hard cash makes the absence of a national commitment to identifying and eliminating the environmental causes of breast cancer seem that much worse. The sanitized cuteness of pink-ribboned teddy bears makes the slash and burn treatments of the bio-medical cancer industry feel all the more painful. And the pink-painted messages praising “strength” and “optimism” reinforce the “holistic sickening” at the core of many of the complimentary and alternative healing modalities that “explain” breast cancer in terms of poor lifestyle choices, suppressed anger, or denial of one’s true femininity.

This year I’ve collected a few of the new (or at least new to me) egregious efforts to commodify, to normalize, to exploit — and to “cutefy” — breast cancer. Click here and here for more serious analyses. And as always, to learn more about “pinkwashing” and to support the work of Breast Cancer Action, click here.


As you can see in the feature photo, the pinkwashing Olympics have their new champion: the police department of Greenfield, Massachusetts announced on Facebook that for the month of October, they’ll be using pink handcuffs. Officers will also sport pins reading “Arrest Breast Cancer.” Because there’s no problem you can’t solve that way.

The news of this very well-intentioned, probably, gesture comes via CBS Boston and also the department’s own exuberant press release:

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month. While most people are aware of breast cancer, many forget to take the steps to have a plan to detect the disease in its early stages and encourage others to do the same.

Many of our community members, including some of our own friends and family members, have been affected by breast or other types of cancer.

Officers of the Greenfield Police Department have “gone pink” in order to raise awareness for the disease! All of our officers have changed their collar pins, which were blue and white state seals to pink and white pins which states “ARREST BREAST CANCER – UNLOCK THE CURE” surrounding a pink ribbon and a pair of handcuffs. Some of our officers have even replaced their on duty silver handcuffs with pink ones and will be using them during the course of their work day.

Help us ARREST BREAST CANCER by spreading the word and by making your own early detection plan.

 

Remember: when placing a suspect in a light chokehold or frisking them against a vehicle, always ask if they’ve performed a monthly breast self-exam. There’s no awareness like the kind that takes hold in the back of a squad car.

Pink Car
(Photo courtesy of ctpost)

In this era of stop and frisk, rising rates of incarceration among women and continued sexual abuse of women in prison it’s hard to get excited about a pink police car. “In 2006, a Department of Justice (DOJ) study found that women in prison are at significantly greater risk for cancer than their male counterparts. Out of every 10,000 incarcerated women, 831 had cancer, compared to 108 per 10,000 men.” According to the Department of Justice there are over 1,000 incarcerated women who either have or have had breast cancer. To learn more about  the suffering of “breast cancer behind bars” click here.

Pinkwashing has also expanded in the usual commercial way:

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(Image courtesy of the Shultz Shoes Website.)

Just what every woman needs to stay healthy: Pink stilettos. Perhaps the message is: Don’t worry about dying of breast cancer when you can kill yourself running for the train in pretty pink shoes.

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(Image courtesy of the Hard Rock Hotel Website.)

This year the Hard Rock Hotels are offering “Pink Rooms” with pink bed sheets and an option to purchase pink bathrobes. The activists among us will be relieved to know that we can stop organizing, lobbying, researching and lecturing. All we need to do to eliminate breast cancer is “Get into bed” and “relax for the cause.”  And in case you’re more of a “party for the cause” than a “relax for the cause” kind of gal, Hard Rock Hotels have you covered as well. Who knew that pink margaritas prevent (or is it cure?) breast cancer?

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Pink ribbon and other cause marketing can mask conflicts of interest, like when companies promote the idea of cancer research but also manufacture ,disseminate, or sell products that contain toxic or carcinogenic ingredients. I’ve recently seen dry cleaning companies jumping on the Pinktober bandwagon:

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(Image Courtesy of Westportnow.com)

What this and similar ads leave out is that PERC, the solvent used in most dry-cleaning, is a known carcinogen.

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(Image Courtesy of Glamour.com)

Recent studies also show the harmful effects of working in a nail salon surrounded by fumes from chemicals in nail polish and yet companies are selling nail polish to “promote breast cancer awareness.”

And finally, to take away the sour tastes in our mouths (whether caused by chemo or by pinkwashing): Nothing promotes the health and wellness of women quite like sugar filled candies with cute little pink ribbons all over them.

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(Image courtesy of orientaltrading.com)

 

 


We Can Do Better

While spending on breast cancer detection and treatment continues to increase, funding for prevention – for learning about the causes of breast cancer – is far less marketable. In past years my home state, the Massachusetts legislature failed to fund research on potential carcinogenic impacts of chemical exposure despite clear findings that there are specific communities in Massachusetts with particularly high rates of breast cancer.

As for me, I’ll skip the pink bathrobes, candy, nail polish and (hopefully) police cars, and spend my money on real research into breast cancer prevention. For more on the Silent Spring Institute click here.

Thank you to Robin Yang and Ashely Rose Difraia for help with this post.

Access to Education: Further Thoughts

In a previous post I warned about what I call “fake” education; that is, education that drills students in self-blame and a sense of failure and that disguises the sources of power that perpetuate inequalities. My argument was NOT a call to eliminate access to educational programs until we perfect curricula and pedagogy, but rather a cautionary note based on conversations I’ve had with criminalized women in Boston over the past decade. Let me be clear, as one long-time educator wrote to me, “Without the commitment to access, any reform in the content or delivery of education won’t matter.”

Rev. Vivian Nixon, Executive Director of the College and Community Fellowship and Co-Founder of the Education from the Inside Out Coalition, has kindly allowed me to re-post her insightful thoughts on these issues. You can read the full post here. I’ve re-printed excerpts below. I urge you to read the full article.

Let’s Get Real: Prison Is No Place for Elitism

“It’s incredibly important to pay close attention to quality education on the inside. Having been inside myself — a high school graduate stuck in a prison with no post-secondary options — I argue that any attempt to create broader access to programming would be welcomed by those who currently have no educational alternatives. …”

“It would be wonderful if everyone qualified for Bard Prison Initiative or other intense liberal arts programs, but we know that many will not. Those who do not qualify for a Bard-caliber program could easily do well in a less rigorous community college program. Furthermore, not everyone has an interest in the contemplative life. Some just want to learn how to be a Computer Technician or gain some other marketable skill because they feel it’s their best chance of escaping lifelong poverty.

“That option should be readily available. If one of education’s main concerns is helping students forge a sense of individuality, introspection and self-determination, then the choice to limit educational programs in prison as an attempt to “do what’s best for them” proves antithetical to our ultimate goals. Just as students on the outside participate in educational programs of all levels, incarcerated students should also have a wide range of options — every program should not be exclusive. While quality must not be ignored, we should agree on what we mean by “quality” and not confuse it for elitism. …”

“The practical role of education in helping those incarcerated escape the cycles of marginalization, crime and poverty is as large as its transformative ability to foster critical thought, self-reflection and a stronger sense of self for those in the classroom. When we account for the irrefutable correlation between lack of education and rates of imprisonment, we must take every opportunity we can to provide educational programming for those who need it most. That means a wide range of programs, broader financial aid eligibility and a persistent, long-term commitment to improving educational access for all.”

I’d like to thank the many friends and colleagues who commented on the “Knowledge is Power” post. Stay tuned for additional posts on this very important topic.