Tag Archives: opiates

White Women, Opiates and Prison

Author’s note: Race is hard to write about; so is class; so is gender. I struggle with articulating — especially in a short essay —  two truths. Broad social forces and inequalities impact life experiences. And, each individual has her own unique life experiences framed by the particular ways in which class, race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, nationality, citizenship status and other social categories intersect for her. I thank Robin Yang and Lois Ahrens for helping me try to get it right here. I accept sole responsibility for bits where I’ve missed the mark.

Black men have been the face of incarceration in America for decades, and black men continue to be locked up at rates far exceeding those of other gender and racial demographic groups. But, over the past few years, just as the pace of incarceration finally began to decline for men and for black women, incarceration rates have risen by 47.1% for white women. Opiate use seems to be driving much of that increase.

CDC Director Tom Frieden, in a 2013 briefing, announced that rates of opiate use, abuse, overdose and death are rapidly increasing among women. Aside from age (those in the 45-54 year age group have the highest rate of opiate related death), Frieden did not offer demographic details beyond the rather meaningless “mothers, wives, sisters, and daughters.”

Research published last week by the Boston Globe found that the number of babies born in Massachusetts with opiates in their system is more than triple the national rate, and that the numbers in Maine and Vermont are even worse. This research did not track race, but we do know that Maine and Vermont are two of the whitest states in the county – 95% white, Massachusetts is 84% white, and that many of the opiate hot spots in these states are poor, white communities. In Fall River, for instance, approximately 72% of residents have received a prescription for opiates, a rate well above the state average of 40 percent.

While the media seems shocked to “discover” that white women make illicit use of drugs, we really should not be surprised. Indeed, over the same years in which black men were the face of incarceration, white women were the face of medicine. White women take more prescription and over-the-counter medication, are prescribed more pain medication, undergo more cosmetic surgery, and make more doctor visits than any other major demographic group. White women are the greatest users of commercial holistic healing (alternative and complementary medicine). And white women are over-represented on pharmaceutical commercials and in high profile “war on illness” campaigns such as the pink ribbon breast cancer extravaganzas.

Just as higher incarceration rates do not necessarily mean that black men are especially wicked, higher medication rates do not necessarily mean that white women are especially sick. They do mean that white women tend to be portrayed as particularly in need of — and deserving of — expert medical care, and that the health challenges of white women are treated with more attention than the health challenges of other groups. Think, for instance, of how the natural aging process becomes seen as a medical problem (medicalized) when millions of prescriptions are written for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for women who do not have any disease other than not being young. And think of the racial implications of these findings from a large government study released in the 1990s: HRT use among white women was 89% higher than among black women and white women were 54% more likely than black women to receive HRT counseling from their doctors.

Women – and especially white women – are prescribed more psychiatric medication (especially for depression and anxiety) than men. Jonathan Metzl, in Prozac on the Couch: Prescribing Gender in the Era of Wonder Drugs, traced advertisements for psychiatric medication in the American Journal of Psychiatry over a period of decades. He found that marketing to doctors disproportionately addressed women’s problems. Advertisements for Milltown and then Valium featured women’s unhappiness with their husbands, family responsibilities and sex, and offered medication as a way to make them more compliant with expected gender roles. Overwhelmingly, the pictures in these advertisements were of white women benefiting from treatment provided by white male doctors.

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What does all of this mean for white women’s experiences of opiates today? Continue reading White Women, Opiates and Prison